Tamdhu 10, 2005 (Signatory for Stoller Wines)

Tamdhu 10, 2005, Signatory for Stoller
This is the third of four Signatory exclusives I purchased from Binny’s while in Chicago in September. Like the Glen Keith 19 that I reviewed in October, this was bottled not for Binny’s themselves but for Stoller Wines & Spirits, a Chicago-based wholesaler/distributor. As to whether anyone other than Binny’s carries their cask selections I’m not sure, and I rather suspect that these casks are also selected by the Binny’s crew. If you can confidently confirm or correct please write in below. Anyway, I took a flier on this bottle as I’ve had some pretty decent young, sherried Tamdhus before and the price was not too bad. I opened it a couple of weeks ago for my local group’s November tasting and while it smelled nice as I was pouring it, it didn’t really impress any of us overmuch. I thought it was too oaky and raw and that the sherry character was not as evident as you might expect from a first-fill sherry butt. It is at a very high strength though, and I rather expect there’s been some improvement with some air in the bottle. Let’s see.  Continue reading

Tamdhu 22, 1991 (Cadenhead’s)

Tamdhu 22, 1991
This 200 ml bottle of a recent Cadenhead’s small batch Tamdhu was brought back for me from Edinburgh by a friend a couple of weeks ago and was recommended by the redoubtable Jolly Toper, who I know from the WhiskyWhiskyWhisky forums.

I’ve never had a port matured whisky of this advanced age, and I can’t say that I would have been drawn to it on my own steam. 22 years in port casks seems like a lot and the risk of the whisky being overbearingly sweet or cough-syrupy seems high. And in general I’ve preferred port finished/matured whiskies that are also peated (the Ballechin #3, for instance) to those that aren’t (the Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban, for instance). I was willing to trust the Jolly Toper’s judgement though, especially as I had the opportunity to get relatively unusual whiskies that I couldn’t get in the US or get shipped to the US. And Tamdhu itself is a distillery I’ve had good, if limited, experience with. Let’s see how this goes. Continue reading

Tamdhu 7, 2004 (Van Wees)

vanweestamdhuAnother Tamdhu. I mentioned in my recent review of the Lombard bottling that I had encountered the nutty/beany note I got on the finish of that whisky in another young Tamdhu, and remembered later that I had saved a large reference sample of said young Tamdhu before finishing that bottle a few months ago. So here is a quick take on that for purposes of comparison (I first tried a very small pour of the Lombard Tamdhu to see if my impressions of that one were consistent, and they were).

This is, in fact, a much younger whisky, and was bottled from a sherry butt by the Dutch budget bottler, Van Wees (the Lombard bottling was from a bourbon cask). They don’t have the strongest reputation but I have not had any bad experiences with their bottlings, and, indeed, have had a number that presented great value for money.

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Tamdhu 13, 1989 (Lombard)

tamdhulombardTamdhu is a not-particularly-storied distillery located in the Speyside region. Until recently, it was part of the Edrington group, which owns the far more storied distilleries of Highland Park and the Macallan, but was mothballed in 2009. It has since been purchased by Ian MacLeod, who own the Glengoyne distillery and release various lines of independent bottlings and blends. It is not clear what form the output of the distillery will take under the new ownership, but in its previous incarnation Tamdhu was known in the US for its 10 year old whisky, which was (and where still available, continues to be) one of the great values in malts, often available in the vicinity of $20. Not a remarkable malt but far, far better than the price might indicate and better than many priced far higher. Independent bottlings of Tamdhu are not difficult to find, however, and my review today is of one of those. The bottler is Lombard, whose presentation generally outstrips the reputation of its bottlings–at least from what I have read; if your experience is different please make some recommendations in the comments below.

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